Modal Verbs


CAN
COULD
MAY
MIGHT
WILL
WOULD
SHALL
SHOULD
OUGHT TO
MUST
NEED
DARE

 
 
When do we use modals? 
  • To talk about someone's ability (or inability) to do something

  • example: "We can find your house without the street plan."
                    "She can't have a daughter that old!"
  • To talk about an action that is necessary (or impossible, or not necessary)

  • example: "You must always have your driver's licence when you are driving your car."
                    "You needn't carry your passport around with you."
  • To talk about a situation that is possible (or impossible)

  • example: "Do be careful with that glass, the baby might knock it over"

 
 
A modal verb always has the same form: There is no past form (-ed), no present participle (-ing) and no 3rd persons singular (-s).
Modal verbs come before the subject in questions: example: "May I come to your house for tea?"
Negative forms: Modal verbs have n't or not after them in the negative.
example: "mustn't" - "needn't".

 
 
 
PRESENT FORM
PAST FORM
can
could
may
might
will
would
shall
should
must
-
ought to
-
need
-


When you are sure that you understand the topic, you can go on to the exercises.
 





Page created by Lilliam Hurst
on September 30 2001
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